Sunday, 24 September 2017
A- A A+

exhaustMore than 614,000 vehicles failed their inspections last year, a 10.5% failure rate for the 5.8 million vehicles inspected in Portugal.

The National Association of Automobile Inspection Centers said that the main causes of vehicle inspection failures in 2016 were faulty lights and electrical equipment, dodgy steering, clapped out suspension and illegally bald tyres.

The association that represents the automobile inspection centers says between 2012 and 2015 the percentage of failures has been going down, from 13.34% to 10.58% in the three years.

The association’s president, Paulo Areal, says that inspections help "reduce the number of vehicles with mechanical problems that that could become a danger to all road users” and is pushing for mandatory inspection of anything mechanical that used the road, especially tractors, as a way of preventing accidents."

This failure rate means that of 5.8 million vehicles inspected in 2016, more than 614,000 were prevented from being used without first being fixed.

Comments  

0 #3 Ed 2017-09-13 07:47
Quoting Peter Booker:
As liveaboard probably knows, there was a time in this country when push bikes needed a registration, and I remember seeing many bicycles with number plates. If they were still registered like that, you would need to inspect them. In the light of what has happened in London recently, possibly no bad thing.

There also was a time when a licence was needed to carry a cigarette licence... happy days...
Quote
+1 #2 Peter Booker 2017-09-13 07:25
As liveaboard probably knows, there was a time in this country when push bikes needed a registration, and I remember seeing many bicycles with number plates. If they were still registered like that, you would need to inspect them. In the light of what has happened in London recently, possibly no bad thing.
Quote
+1 #1 liveaboard 2017-09-12 19:26
the regime is pretty strict in Portugal; and as tractor person, I know that many are in a very poor state of repair.
But how can they be inspected when by nature, these machines operate in rural areas, mostly far from inspection stations?
Will the roads be blocked by tractors all coming and going 50 or 100km at 20kph to get their inspections done?

Now, what about bicycles?
And mule carts?
Quote