Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me

Create an account

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.
Name *
Username *
Password *
Verify password *
Email *
Verify email *
Captcha *

Corrupt Olhão council employees may yet go to jail

olhaoThe two Olhão building inspectors who were handed suspended sentences, after being convicted for extorting money from property owners in exchange for ‘looking the other way’ over building regulation infringements, may end up in jail after all.

The Public Prosecution Service has appealed against the suspension of the two sentences for corruption and embezzlement handed out to the two women.

According to today's statement from the prosecution service, one of the female defendants was sentenced to three years in prison and the other to three years and one month in prison, both sentences were suspended.
 
The women, aged 41 and 54, were detained last April as part of a police operation last entitled ‘Extranumerário.’

“Using their professional status, they would receive money from third-parties to carry out acts that went against their duties,” read the police statement at the time.

Searches uncovered €33,000 in cash at the home of one of the inspectors who failed to provide a credible reason why so much cash was at her property.

The public prosecution service says that if someone is given three years or more, this sentence should not be suspended and the convicted person must go to jail, adding that the women certainly should have been banned from continuing to be employed in the public sector.

Olhão’s mayor, António Pina, failed to sack the two women despite their convictions, thus condoning their behaviour, despite earlier stating that “it is important to fight corruption in public services.” It is important, but not in Olhão it seems.

When the sentence was defined, the Public Ministry had already stated that it was considering appealing the judge's decision.

The facts leading to the specimen charge date back to March 2016 when the two women demanded money from a local property owner - if he refused, he would be fined for what they said was "unlicensed work."

 

 

Comments  

0 #5 r 2017-05-14 07:36
Anyone interested in knowing more about Portugal 2017, this sums it up well. Very sad. Another lost opportunity to move the country forward.
Quote
0 #4 Charly 2017-05-10 07:09
Unfortunately this are only 2 "very small fishes" in an "extremely large pool" of some 308 circumscriptions.
We can see that "denunciation" and "difamation"
aparentely "help" in Portugal...
Quote
0 #3 Ed 2017-05-09 19:44
Quoting Maxwell:
Ref: P.Booker. It is quite certain that the Environment Agency were fully aware of the building work going on. Equally fully aware that they had not been officially notified by the relevant local Council. Yet they allowed the work to continue.

The Portuguese coastal and riverbank legislation has been around for several years now. Government maps are satellite accurate to millimetres. Many thousands of property owners up and down Portugal - many foreign - must also now learn their fate, if they have not already. Unless of course they can sell on to yet another foreigner mug - supported by bent planners, lawyers, architects, estate agents and builders. All sniffing an earner - none can operate alone.

This is what happened to the Silves couple. The Agricultural department had months of ariel photos of the building site from foundations upwards yet never once told the owners that there was a problem. Hundreds of thousands of euros later, the State-funded department said the building was illegal, despite the council having issued a building permit. Why not say something early on? To drop foreigners right in it when they have done nothing wrong but trust the Council.
Quote
0 #2 Maxwell 2017-05-09 18:53
Ref: P.Booker. It is quite certain that the Environment Agency were fully aware of the building work going on. Equally fully aware that they had not been officially notified by the relevant local Council. Yet they allowed the work to continue.

The Portuguese coastal and riverbank legislation has been around for several years now. Government maps are satellite accurate to millimetres. Many thousands of property owners up and down Portugal - many foreign - must also now learn their fate, if they have not already. Unless of course they can sell on to yet another foreigner mug - supported by bent planners, lawyers, architects, estate agents and builders. All sniffing an earner - none can operate alone.
Quote
+2 #1 Peter Booker 2017-05-09 08:33
Are these two implicated in the Tod and Roseby case? Just how did the Britons achieve a building permit which the Environment agency now says is wrong?
Quote