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Portugal’s 2017 road death increase second highest in EU

crashlouleThe number of deaths on Portugal’s roads rose 14% in 2017 compared to the previous year, the second highest increase recorded in the European Union (EU) where the numbers fell by 2% overall.
 
According to preliminary data released by Brussels, Portugal’s 14% increase was second only to Cyprus where road deaths increased 15% over the year.
 
The European road death decline has now reached 20% since 2010 when the average number of fatalities on Portuguese roads was 80 per million, and in the EU, 63 per million.
 
Sweden (25 deaths per million inhabitants), the United Kingdom (27), the Netherlands (31) and Denmark (32) reported the best results in 2017.
 
In relation to 2016, Estonia and Slovenia reported the largest decrease in the number of fatalities, respectively -32% and -20%.

Comments  

+1 #9 chez 2018-04-13 08:13
Last June I was pulled over in one of the GNR routine checkpoints and given a breath test. I am teetotal but the smell of alcohol from the officer as he spoke to me indicated that he had obviously had a drink or two and it was only 11.30 in the morning :eek:
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+2 #8 Hamilton 2018-04-12 10:23
The authorities need to keep a close watch on driving schools and driver testing stations. A few years back there were several news reports about testing stations that did no testing of those that paid an inflated fee. Just stamped the applicant as suitable for pan-European roads.
In a more evolved country a responsible driving instructor would be comfortable whistle blowing those of their bad learners / poor drivers that they later knew had passed their test. Or, as in the UK, not submitting the learner for the test until they were considered ready.
But in Portugal, where whistle blowing is still misunderstood following its total misuse in the Salazar decades - such an Instructor would soon lose their clientele.
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+2 #7 Dolphie 2018-04-11 16:48
The word 'macho' comes to mind. Never give way, neveallow someone out at lights when they are red, odiaxere a prime example, speed thru lights on red just after they have changed, have seen a pedestrian hit on a crossing on that one
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+1 #6 Margaridaana 2018-04-11 14:03
Quoting NickA:
In my view the standard of driving is the principal cause of accidents - not the quality of the road. Drivers should be able to adjust to different or poor road conditions. At the top of my list would be a lack of indicator use - particularly at junctions, roundabouts and pulling into traffic. Drink driving is also prevalent as is use of mobile phones whilst driving.

Absolutely right Nick. Portuguese are notorious for tailgating, bad overtaking and dangerous use of traffic roundabouts. Considering they are usually so laid back about things, it seems their dormant aggro. emerges once they get behind the wheel of a vehicle. And yes, Laura the eastern 125 is not a good road, but again it comes down to the competence of the driver adjusting to the conditions, rather than the road itself.
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0 #5 Jack Reacher 2018-04-11 13:55
It's not the quality of road or the number of potholes on the EN125 that makes Portugal one of the most lethal places in Europe to drive a car. One needs to examine the inside of a Portuguese mind, and see what triggers such deranged driving behaviour behind the wheel of a car. In the meantime best to avoid any number plate branding a blue P.
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0 #4 Al 2018-04-11 08:48
Roundabouts are appearing everywhere, a majority of drivers in Portugal don't know how to use indicators or even get in the right lane on a roundabout. To top it off you have traffic rules for roundabouts in Portugal that are inconsistent with rest of Europe.
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+6 #3 NickA 2018-04-11 07:43
In my view the standard of driving is the principal cause of accidents - not the quality of the road. Drivers should be able to adjust to different or poor road conditions. At the top of my list would be a lack of indicator use - particularly at junctions, roundabouts and pulling into traffic. Drink driving is also prevalent as is use of mobile phones whilst driving.
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+5 #2 laura Virginia 2018-04-11 06:05
Are there statistics about the amount caused by E 125.! Compared with the rest of the country.Soon if you want to stay alive ,stay away from eastern Algarve,where the road is very dangerous.
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+7 #1 Simon 2018-04-10 22:42
Arrived in Portugal in 2017 and I’m am amazed how agressive people are driving. Speeding like idiots into roundabouts to try and get in before one that is already inside the cirkle. They can also try to bypass you in the roundabout. There is also a tendency that a car try to stay as close as possible behind you even if there is no possibility to pass you in the next kilometer or so on the local roads.
Suggest we all take it a little more calmly go reduce risks of accidents.
On top we can save 10-20 % of the costs on fuel by mote respectful driving.
It’s never to late to change behavior and become a driver that cares of others (and themselves).
Alkohol and driving is another issue in the country and let’s hope people starts to understand the dangerous in the combinstions.
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