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Fuel truck drivers announce new strike from 7th to 22nd of September

gnr fuel strikeThe Portuguese fuel truck drivers will conduct a “strategic strike” during overtime and on weekends and bank holidays from the 7th to the 22nd of September.

The announcement was made today by Francisco São Bento, the president of the National Hazardous Materials Drivers Union (SNMMP).

The decision to move on to another strike (after the previous one was called off by the union last Sunday) comes after the failure of negotiations during discussions between ANTRAM and the Union.

The previous strike had a discernible effect across the country, causing queues at fuel stations and limits on fuel usage. Moreover, the government put an emergency network of fuel stations in place in order to minimise the possibility of regions completely running out of fuel

For this new strike - in September – “the normal eight-hour working hours of any worker are assured to be worked as normal”. That is why Francisco São Bento does not see "the need to provide minimum services".

But for the trade unionist points out that “our work depends a lot on overtime, that was already proven in the last strike. Let us prove once again that the companies we work for are based on extra work,” he stated.

The main current point of contention is related to the increase by 125 euros to the drivers' monthly pay. The union is only willing to sit at the negotiating table with the Directorate-General for Employment and Labour Relations if this number is further increased to 175 euros, rejecting the previous increase.

As for other forms of struggle promised by the Union, in addition to the strike, Francisco São Bento said that "we will wait serenely" and "start what we were mandated in the workers' plenary on Sunday".

The previous general strike of fuel truck drivers lasted from the 12th to the 18th of August. The Government, however, has already publicly announced the end of the energy crisis that arose during the strike.

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Comments  

0 #6 Peter Booker 2019-08-24 08:11
Quoting Richard 2:
Please keep in mind that for drivers of bulk liquids (be they hazardous or non-hazardous materials) the majority of a driver's time is spent standing still, watching the material load or unload. That being said, they none-the-less deserve a proper wage.


Not driving time, then. But they are still at work, and I suppose concentrating on the safe transfer of their loads.

Behind Gran Plaza in Tavira, there is often a queue of lorries waiting to unload. The drivers are not actually driving their vehicles, but are at work, waiting. I cannot think of anything more tiring than waiting in a queue, with no prospect of influencing the speed of unloading.

I would describe their situation as frustrating, and that feeling comes over strongly in their strike actions.
+3 #5 Richard 2 2019-08-22 17:03
Please keep in mind that for drivers of bulk liquids (be they hazardous or non-hazardous materials) the majority of a driver's time is spent standing still, watching the material load or unload. That being said, they none-the-less deserve a proper wage.
+3 #4 RG 2019-08-22 15:02
Next year tourism bosses will no doubt announce a down turn in tourism ! ...Wonder why ?? Perhaps ....Petrol strikes , pilot strikes , Ryanair base closure . Baggage handlers strikes in the UK. No wonder people are put off travelling , PS daren’t mention Brexit !
+4 #3 Peter Booker 2019-08-22 09:05
Quoting mj1:
peace? didn't last long!

But long enough to get us out of the main tourist season.

If the supply of adequate fuel to the petrol stations relies essentially on the overtime worked by these drivers, many of them must be working beyond the safe limits of driving.
+8 #2 Dennis.P 2019-08-22 05:37
Is there any academic research at an EU level (so unarguable) on fuel driver tiredness if they are behind the wheel for long distances or on duty for lengthy periods ? Over 30 years ago this was an EU hot topic and led immediately to tachometer 'spies in cabs' as this also involves drivers of other hazardous loads like explosive chemicals. What has happened since with so much of the Portuguese fuel drivers earnings being made through overtime not in an 8 hour routine? Do we assume that the tachometers are being switched off for much of the working day; only switched back on if a police stop is ahead?
+3 #1 mj1 2019-08-21 19:33
peace? didn't last long!

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