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‘Palmyra, Queen of the Desert’ - new exhibition planned for Tavira Museum

PalmyraThe Islamic Centre in Tavira’s municipal museum will host, from March 9, an exhibition, ‘Palmyra, Queen of the Desert,’ displaying the photography of Luís Reina.

This show is a photo tour of Palmyra, an ancient city located in central Syria, classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980 and considered one of the most important archaeological sites in the world.

The exhibition also is to display sculptures by the Portuguese artist Manuel Ribeiro.

This collaboration creates a contemporary reconstruction of the archaeological site.

The images are subtitled in Portuguese and English and are given context and meaning with a video that explain and describes the trip to Syria made by the author in 2007.

The inauguration is scheduled for March 9, and the he show will be on display until September 21, 2019, in the museum at Praça da República 5, Tavira.

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Comments  

+2 #2 Boris H 2019-02-22 08:08
Quoting Elsa,
"and no one in the chain of command sufficiently educated to appreciate the loss"
.......................................................................
Just wondering if it is possible for you to limit your aggressive language toward your host country.
Again, there seems to be this superiority complex that some individuals apparently allude themselves to.
-1 #1 Elsa 2019-02-15 08:32
Portugal still does not have anything resembling an overall control and management mechanism to find, declare and freeze development on historical sites. It seems crazy that even nowadays we keep hearing of destruction of early settlements and buildings and no one in the chain of command sufficiently educated to appreciate the loss. The clearances for the monster olive plantations in southern Alentejo shifted thousands of tons of large boulders that may well have been prehistoric burial cairns or even dolmens. But we will never know now.

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