UK government ‘travel-corridor roulette’ devastates Portuguese tourist industry prospects

112travel rouletteTwo weeks ago when the UK government added Portugal to the travel corridor list, the chairman of Sunvil, Noel Josephides, issued a statement saying he was delighted to start selling holidays to Portugal again, “just in time for the last couple of weeks of the peak summer season, but also in time for the glorious autumnal months of September and October, right into November”.

By the beginning of this week the rumour was that the country’s brief spell as a “safe destination” was about to come to an end as coronavirus cases in the country went above 20 per 100,000 people (–the level at which the UK government considers triggering quarantine conditions) due to a growing number of outbreaks around Lisbon, as well as in the northerly regions.

On Tuesday, the UK ambassador to Portugal fuelled speculation that Portugal would soon revert to the quarantine list when he warned that air bridges can “change quickly”. The hint that the 20 August decision could be reversed was enough to unsettle British holidaymakers in Portugal and spark a rush to get back to the UK before the dreaded deadline. EasyJet sold out of all its flights from Faro to airports in Britain on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of this week.

“They seem to start with a rumour and hints then there’s panic overseas – and everyone rushes to book [a flight home]. It’s no way to work – you don’t drop the rumours and let them run for a week,” said Josephides.

This time the rumours proved false, at least for English holidaymakers. On Thursday afternoon Grant Shapps, the UK transport secretary, announced that there would be no changes to the travel corridor list this week, although Wales and Scotland disagreed. Shapps’ reprieve was unexpected but did nothing to reassure either holidaymakers or tourism businesses. The damage had already been done. “Unless we have some sort of testing in place you might as well forget the rest of the season,” said Josephides. “It just isn’t working in Portugal, or anywhere.”

After weeks of travel corridor roulette, holidaymakers have so little faith in the quarantine rules that some took to Twitter to ask Shapps if he was likely to change his mind tomorrow. The fact that England’s decision differed from Wales and Scotland’s did nothing to allay the confusion.

“Meant to be returning to England Sunday. Booked a backup flight for tomorrow just in case (as have many Brits). Are you saying we are ok til Sunday? Need to make a decision re Friday flight,” tweeted Nicola Syms to the transport secretary.

In the Algarve, where Britons make up 40% of all tourists, the region is bearing the brunt of the damage. CEO of the Hotel Association of Portugal, Cristina Siza Vieira, said the addition of Portugal to the travel corridor on 20 August “felt like an oxygen balloon”. Hotels that had been closed reopened and staff who had been laid off were brought back to work. “It had an immediate impact on reservations, and made hotels dream of a good September, October and November. Now people feel really frustrated and discouraged, especially in the Algarve.”

Chitra Stern owns the Martinhal hotel group, which has two properties in the Algarve and two in the Lisbon area. She said: “We will be lucky to have a third of our business in the Algarve this year.” Stern said the phones began ringing within minutes of the air bridge announcement on 20 August– and were ringing again on Thursday with cancellations.

The yo-yo-ing situation has forced some businesses to halt altogether. James Mayor’s tour business Grape Discoveries offers tailored wine tours in and around Porto. After lockdown was lifted in mid-May, he knew some difficult months lay ahead. Around 90% of his clients come from either the US or the UK. With a ban still in place for Americans, he was banking on Britons. But despite the decision on 20 August to include Portugal on the UK travel corridor list, they haven’t returned. Mayor’s business isn’t alone in this fate, and the outlook is unlikely to improve unless drastic changes are seen.

Credit to The Guardian

Pin It

Comments  

-4 #16 Chip 2020-09-11 10:51
Quoting Trevor Morgan:
Quoting Chip:
Trevor Morgan, you previously stated that Worldometer was a flawed source of Covid statistics but then admitted you had no better source.
Of course it is flawed (otherwise China would be reporting credible figures) particularly regarding deaths which are based on different criteria in different countries. Not so new cases.

At no point did I "admit" that I had no better source, I merely corrected your erroneous comment on the same subject. Perhaps if you stuck to the subject on hand with constructive comments instead of trolling others' contributions with which you disagree you wouldn't be accused of trolling and creating noise.


So Trevor, yet another opportunity for you. Which source of statistics is more accurate in your opinion? No BS please.
+2 #15 Trevor Morgan 2020-09-09 20:11
Quoting Chip:
Trevor Morgan, you previously stated that Worldometer was a flawed source of Covid statistics but then admitted you had no better source.
Of course it is flawed (otherwise China would be reporting credible figures) particularly regarding deaths which are based on different criteria in different countries. Not so new cases.

At no point did I "admit" that I had no better source, I merely corrected your erroneous comment on the same subject. Perhaps if you stuck to the subject on hand with constructive comments instead of trolling others' contributions with which you disagree you wouldn't be accused of trolling and creating noise.
+2 #14 Steve 2020-09-09 16:55
Quoting Peter Dickinson :
Also, with such low numbers you need a clear and controlled testing plan to obtain robust figures

Assuming the test is accurate which it isn't, we can look at Iceland where it has tested the most people, per head of population and estimate where we may finally end up with Covid. The infection fatality rate in Iceland stands at between 0.03% and 0.28%. As a country Iceland also has the lowest IFR because they performed more tests. This is good news because if Covid's IFR is roughly 0.16% then it's no more dangerous than a severe flu pandemic.
+3 #13 Peter Dickinson 2020-09-08 17:37
Just to be clear I am not suggesting that Covid is not widespread in the UK, just that the statistics being shown are not fit for purpose. Also, with such low numbers you need a clear and controlled testing plan to obtain robust figures
-3 #12 Peter Dickinson 2020-09-08 17:33
UK reporting of statistics is banal. At the start of August Gov. ministers showed charts of rising cases in July. Look at the official UK statistics and correct for sample size, it clearly shows cases to be falling. Even without taking into account that more mild or asymptotic people are being tested. If you test100,000 people and find 40 infections then test 200,000 people and find that the cases have increased to 60 infections it does not show, as UK GOV. suggests that Covid cases in the population are higher.
+4 #11 Norman L 2020-09-08 16:25
I know, Chip, but .... :-)
0 #10 Chip 2020-09-08 14:20
Norman L, don't waste your time on trolls with multiple login names.
+1 #9 Norman L 2020-09-08 09:36
Quoting David:
Asymptomatic 'cases' based on phoney tests do not constitute a pandemic. Single figure deaths in populations of tens of millions are statistically insignificant. Covid is virtually non-existent now in both countries.


Amazing that you can post such drivel and find 4 people to upvote it (same ones who'll downvote this, I expect). Marseille is running out of intensive care beds for the new influx of Covid patients. India has 90,000 new cases 1,000 deaths in one day. 'But that's in France, and India's a long way away, and Covid's a hoax anyway'.
0 #8 David 2020-09-07 17:26
Asymptomatic 'cases' based on phoney tests do not constitute a pandemic. Single figure deaths in populations of tens of millions are statistically insignificant. Covid is virtually non-existent now in both countries.
0 #7 Chip 2020-09-07 09:37
Trevor Morgan, you previously stated that Worldometer was a flawed source of Covid statistics but then admitted you had no better source.
Of course it is flawed (otherwise China would be reporting credible figures) particularly regarding deaths which are based on different criteria in different countries. Not so new cases.

You must be a registered user to make comments.
Please register here to post your comments.