Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me

Create an account

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.
Name *
Username *
Password *
Verify password *
Email *
Verify email *
Captcha *

The liberating power of Brexit

brexitLenThe referendum of June 23, 2016 regarding Britain’s 'remain in' or 'exit from' the European Union, through its subversive Brexit result - the first major, painful defeat for the under German control European Union of the banks and multinationals - undoubtedly shook the dominant British and European political and economical system, writes economist Karderinis Isidoros.*

The British, taken as a whole, are not the people of a protectorate who might have perhaps a slave mentality. They are the proud people of a great country that in the past has been an empire and today is one of the world's largest economies.

After the Referendum - life in Brexit Europe

4801Campaigner, Brian Cave from the 'Votes for Expat Brits' pressure group gives an update on post-Brexit Europe and the progress of the Votes for Life legal challenge by veteran activist Harry Shindler which now is being assessed at the United Nations Commission of Human Rights.

"There are two avenues to explore.

1. Whether to fight the legality of the result or

2. To accept the result and demand that the British Government achieves protection of the way of life of British Citizens in the EU after Brexit.

British Portuguese Chamber of Commerce issues Brexit statement

bpccThe British Portuguese Chamber of Commerce, with its mission to promote bilateral trade and business opportunities between Portugal and the UK by assisting companies engaged in bilateral trade, has issued the following statements concerning the recent Referendum result.

"The soundings that we and other British Chambers of Commerce conducted prior to referendum was that there was a strong preference for Britain to remain within the EU. However the British electorate has made their decision and we must move on even though many of our members may not agree with the choice the British voters have made.

Brexit, Algarve & democracy

Brexit, Algarve & democracyIt seems clear that the majority of Britons want to quit the EU. Most probably the prime minister will have to negotiate the terms of the exit.

Most probably the political leaders of the EU, those who have been involved in scandals such as the special ‘almost no-tax’ Luxembourg agreements with American and German mega-corporations, will offer symbolic advantages for the UK to remain in the EU.

Brexit for family and friends

8572At this time over 300,000 overseas Britons have registered to vote in the Referendum on June 23rd, a ten-fold increase from the years prior to 2015. 

Brian Cave from Votes for Expat Brits in France estimates that had those living overseas for 15 years or more been allowed to register, this figure would have exceeded 600,000.

Brexit Referendum - expat votes postage issues

4774News issued from the Electoral Commission* informs qualifying overseas voters that Postal Votes being posted back to the UK for the EU Referendum are using the International Business Reply Service (IBRS).

This service is commonly used for international mail and does not require any additional postage to be affixed.

British expats will vote to stay in EU

8572The significant majority of expats are set to vote in favour of staying in the EU, one month out from the referendum, according to latest research. 71% are set to vote to stay in the EU and just 23% will vote to leave. Only 6% are still undecided.

Angloinfo, the world’s leading global expat network, has been researching the opinions of its users to determine how they intend to vote in the forthcoming EU referendum. Despite another month of campaigning by both sides of the Brexit debate, hearts and minds haven’t changed for expats with voting intentions remaining the same since the last poll Angloinfo conducted in April.

The weakest go to the wall: years of PSD/CDS-PP and the Troika were terrible for the poorest in society

portuguesehouseBetween 2009 and 2013, the poorest in society lost one in four of the euros they earned. They were the ones who suffered the most brutal cuts, with poverty and social exclusion figures falling low enough to match those at the beginning of the century. 

I don’t know if you remember, but in 2014 Passos Coelho, Portugal's Prime Minister at the time, said that "the economic crisis did not worsen inequality, it even had a tendency to make it a bit better," during a visit to the charity “Santa Casa da Misericórdia”, eventually concluding that during the Troika years it had not been the poor who got screwed over.